Tag Archives: Sildenafil mesylate

br Statistical Analysis br Descriptive statistics are expressed as

Statistical Analysis

Descriptive statistics are expressed as mean ± standard deviation for continuous variables and as frequency and percentages for nominal variables. A paired t test was used to compare the excursion and peak motion speed between the right Sildenafil mesylate and the left diaphragm. The associations between the excursions of the diaphragms and participants\’ characteristics were evaluated by means of the Pearson\’s correlation coefficient and a simple linear regression or Student\’s t test depending on the type of variable (ie, continuous or nominal variable). Continuous variables were height, weight, BMI, tidal volume, vital capacity (VC, %VC), forced expiratory volume (FEV1, FEV1%, and %FEV1), and nominal variables were gender and smoking history. The robustness of the results of the univariate analyses was assessed with multiple linear regression models. The significance level for all tests was 5% (two sided). All data were analyzed using a commercially available software program (JMP; version 12, SAS, Cary, NC, USA).

Results

Participants\’ Characteristics

Table 1 shows the clinical characteristics of all the participants (n = 172).

Excursions and Peak Motion Speeds of the Bilateral Diaphragm

Univariate Analysis of Associations Between the Diaphragmatic Excursions and Participants\’ Demographics

Figure 3. Estimated regression line of the excursion of the diaphragm on BMI or tidal volume. (a) Association between BMI and excursion of the right diaphragm. (b) Association between BMI and excursion of the left diaphragm. (c) Association between tidal volume and excursion of the right diaphragm. (d) Association between tidal volume and excursion of the left diaphragm. Lines show estimated regression (a–d). All scatterplots show correlations (P < 0.05). BMI, body mass index.Figure optionsDownload full-size imageDownload high-quality image (226 K)Download as PowerPoint slide

Multivariate Analysis of Associations Between the Excursions and Participants\’ Demographics

Multiple linear regression analysis using all variables as factors (Model 1) demonstrated smog weight, BMI, and tidal volume were independently associated with the bilateral excursion of the diaphragms (all P < 0.05) after adjusting for other clinical variables, including age, gender, smoking history, height, VC, %VC, FEV1, FEV1%, and %FEV1. There were no significant associations between the excursion of the diaphragms and variables including age, gender, smoking history, height, VC, %VC, FEV1, FEV1%, and %FEV1 (Table 4). Additionally, a multiple linear regression model using age, gender, BMI, tidal volume, VC, FEV1, and smoking history as factors (Model 2) was also fit as a sensitivity analysis, taking into account the correlation among variables (eg, BMI, height, and weight; VC and %VC; FEV1, FEV1%, and %FEV1). Model 2 (Supplementary Data S1) gave results consistent with Model 1 (Table 4): higher BMI and higher tidal volume were independently associated with the increased bilateral excursion of the diaphragms (all P < 0.05). The adjusted R2 in Model 1 was numerically higher than that in Model 2 (right, 0.19 vs. 0.16, respectively; left, 0.16 vs. 0.13, respectively).